There are many kinds of watercolor paints. My favorite comes in a little glass bottle and is so vibrant and rich in pigments that it’s more like ink than paint. Even with the addition of some water it stays bright and alive. And, when I apply the paint on the paper with a juicy brush stroke, the magic begins. Painting with my adored “Kolinsky sable” brushes, with their superfine points and smooth handling, the watercolors allow me to see through every brush stroke. And while the translucent and vibrant watercolor plays with the texture of the paper, its delicate surface becomes more visible. In their marriage, they complement each other as they become harmoniously one. I have a constant love affair with watercolor’s lightness and transparency — so subtle and delicate. It is less forgiving than oil paint, demanding me to be spontaneous in the moment and providing me with many opportunities for happy “accidents”. These often become a very important part of the whole painting. There is no transparent white watercolor paint, so I leave the raw color of the paper between the lines. The white part of a watercolor painting is the paper left untouched by the paint, allowing the whole finished painting to be seen in a dream-like quality that suggests a notion of calmness and safety.