Paintings

Oil painting

Oil painting

Oil paint is the principal medium used for creative work, and it was my first admiration.
I enjoy everything about it! The smell, the creamy texture and the way that it glides so easily on a textured canvas. Endless possibilities for exploration! Oil paint remains wet longer than many other types of artists’ materials, so I can change the color, texture and composition many times. It is very forgiving, even allowing me to paint over previous layers. Playing with layers is different than with watercolor paint. Oil paint is not translucent and each additional coat of the paint has the ability to hold or conceal the previous brushstroke. I might even remove an entire layer of paint to begin anew. There are many kinds of brushes – from natural bristle to synthetic. All create different effects of strokes and textures. I experimented with many possibilities. But now I prefer to paint with a thin layer of paint on my canvas using a smaller flat brush. Going with the flow of lines, dots and circles, I challenge myself to paint without covering or changing anything. And because there are many kinds of whites in oil paints, I don’t leave any white surface from the canvas. I’ll just mix the right shade and use it like any other color.

 

Posted by Katalin Klecz in Paintings
Watercolors

Watercolors

There are many kinds of watercolor paints. My favorite comes in a little glass bottle and is so vibrant and rich in pigments that it’s more like ink than paint. Even with the addition of some water it stays bright and alive. And, when I apply the paint on the paper with a juicy brush stroke, the magic begins. Painting with my adored “Kolinsky sable” brushes, with their superfine points and smooth handling, the watercolors allow me to see through every brush stroke. And while the translucent and vibrant watercolor plays with the texture of the paper, its delicate surface becomes more visible. In their marriage, they complement each other as they become harmoniously one. I have a constant love affair with watercolor’s lightness and transparency — so subtle and delicate. It is less forgiving than oil paint, demanding me to be spontaneous in the moment and providing me with many opportunities for happy “accidents”. These often become a very important part of the whole painting. There is no transparent white watercolor paint, so I leave the raw color of the paper between the lines. The white part of a watercolor painting is the paper left untouched by the paint, allowing the whole finished painting to be seen in a dream-like quality that suggests a notion of calmness and safety.

Posted by Katalin Klecz in Paintings